The Trump Trend In Stocks Is Breaking Down

By Bryan Rich 

March 14, 2017, 4:15pm EST                                                                                            Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

As we head into the Fed tomorrow, stocks have fallen back a bit today.

Yesterday we looked at the nice 45 degree climb in stocks since Election Day.  And the big trendline that looked vulnerable to any disruption in the optimism that has led to that climb.  That line gave way today, as you can see.

mar14 spx

The run up, of course, was on the optimism about a pro-growth government, coming in after a decade of underwhelming growth. The dead top in stocks took place the day after President Trump’s first speech before the joint sessions of Congress.  There is a phenomenon in markets where things can run up as people “buy the rumor/news” and then sell-off as people “sell the fact.”

It’s a reflection of investors pricing new information in anticipation of an event, and then selling into the event on the notion that the market has already valued the new information. It looks like that phenomenon may be transpiring in stocks here, especially given that the timeline of tax reform and infrastructure spending looks, now, to be a longer timeline than was anticipated early on.

And as we discussed yesterday, it happens to come at a time where some disruptive events are lining up this week: from a Fed rate hike, to Dutch elections, to Brexit, to G20 protectionist rhetoric.

Stocks are up 6% year-to-date, still in the first quarter.  That’s an aggressive run for the broad stock market, and we’re now probably seeing the early days of the first dip, on the first spell of profit taking.

What about oil?  Oil and stocks traded tick for tick for the better part of last year, first when oil crashed to the mid-$20s, and then when oil proceeded to double from the mid-$20s.  Over the past few days, oil has fallen out of it’s roughly $50-$55 range of the Trump era.  Is it a drag on stocks and another potential disrupter?  I don’t think so.  Oil became a risk to stocks and the global economy last year because it was beginning to trigger bankruptcies in the American shale industry, and was on pace to spread to banks, oil producing countries and the global financial system.  We now have an OPEC production cut under the belt and a highly influential oil man, Tillerson, running the State Department.  With that, oil has been very stable in recent months, relative to the past three years.  It should stay that way – until demand effects of fiscal policy start to show up, which should be very bullish for oil.

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