The dollar has come into the crosshairs of the new president in recent weeks.

Let’s talk about what’s happening and why it matters.

First, it’s highly unusual for the U.S. President to comment on the dollar. The Fed doesn’t even comment. If they do it’s in an indirect way. It has always been a topic deferred to the Treasury Secretary. And the consistent message there has been, for a long time, that we are for a strong dollar.

Things have changed. Or have they? In mid-January, President Trump told the Wall Street Journal that the dollar was “too strong.”

The markets have had a hard time trying to reconcile this comment and stance taken by the administration. But we have to keep in mind: The new president has been a bit less than measured in his words.

When the Fed is in a hiking cycle and other major central banks are still in QE mode, capital will continue to flow into the U.S., and you’re going to get a stronger dollar. When you incentivize U.S. corporates to repatriate a couple trillion dollars they have offshore, you’re going to get a stronger dollar. When/if you pop growth to 4%, you’re going to get higher rates, faster, and you’re going to get a stronger dollar (especially when that growth will lead the rest of the world).

So what is this jawboning on the dollar all about?

As we know, Trump has had an early focus on trade. And he’s used displeasure with trade deficits with countries as a bargaining chip to start conversations about more fair trade terms. But while many have been pulled into the fray over the past few weeks (like Canada, Mexico, the euro zone, etc), this is all about China. My guess is he’s using Mexico as an example for China.

We’ve heard a lot about the $60 billion trade deficit Mexico. It is our third largest trading partner. But that deficit is peanuts when compared to China. Same can be said for Japan, Germany and Canada, three of our other largest trading partners. With China, however, we buy about $483 billion worth of goods. And we sell them only about $116 billion. That’s a $367 billion deficit.

The problem is, it never corrects. It continues, and will continue, unless dealt with. Currencies are the natural trade rebalancer. And with China, it doesn’t happen because they outright dictate the exchange rate. The cheap currency has been/and continues to be its economic driver–and it’s the unfair competitive advantage that has crippled the global economy over time.

Consider this: Over the past 20 years, China’s economy has grown more than fourteen-fold! … to $10 trillion. It’s now the second largest economy in the world. During the same period, the U.S. economy has grown just 2.5x in size. And in the process a global credit bubble was formed. China sells us goods. We give them dollars. China takes our dollars and buys U.S. Treasuries, which suppresses U.S. interest rates and incentivizes borrowing, which fuels more consumption. And the cycle continues.

For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

By Bryan Rich 

February 1, 2017, 4:00pm EST               Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

I talked yesterday about the Fed.  As I said, I think we’ll find that the Fed will shift gears again to stay behind the curve on inflation, to let the economy run a little hot.  They met today and it was a non-event. They said nothing to build momentum on their rate hike from December.

The news of the day has been Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) earnings.  People over the past couple of years have been calling for the decline in Apple.  They’ve said it’s topped.  They can’t innovate in the post-Steve Jobs era.  The iPhone was magic. But reproducing magic isn’t easy.  Once you put a computer in everyone’s pocket, there’s not much more they can do to it with it. These are all of the quips about Apple’s peak.  They may be right.  But Apple’s peak, at least as a stock, is greatly exaggerated.

They reported a huge positive surprise on earnings yesterday after the close.  The stock was up 6% on the day.  But even before that, I suspect it has become a much loved stock in the past two months in the “smart money” investor community.

We should see in the coming weeks, as big investors disclose their positioning for the end of Q4, Apple will have returned to a lot of portfolios again.  Warren Buffett, an investor that has made his fortune buying when others are selling, built a big stake at the lows of the year last year.  And it’s a perfect Buffett stock.

It’s incredibly cheap compared to the market.

The stock still trades at 15x earnings.  Much cheaper than the market.  Apple trades at 13x next year’s projected earnings.  The S&P 500 trades at 16.5x.  What about Apple’s monster cash position?  Apple has even more cash now — a record $246 billion. If we excluded the cash from the valuation, Apple market cap goes down from $675 billion to $429 billion.  That would equate to Apple trading at closer to 9x earnings. Though not an “apples to apples” that valuation would group Apple with the likes of these S&P 500 components that trade around 9 times earnings, like:  Dow Chemical, Prudential Financial, Bed Bath & Beyond, a Norwegian chemical company (LBY), and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. It’s safe to say no one is debating whether or not Hewlett Packard is at the pinnacle of its business. Yet, if we strip out the cash in Apple, AAPL shares are trading closer to an HPE valuation.

Add to that, Apple now has a fresh catalyst coming in, Trump policies. The new President Trump is incentivizing Apple (and others) to bring offshore cash hoards back home with a flat 10% tax.  And Apple makes money – a lot of it.  A cut in the corporate tax rate will be a boon for earnings.  Two years ago, Carl Icahn argued that Apple should use (a lot more of) their cash to buyback shares – and, with that, valued the stock at double its current levels.

For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

By Bryan Rich 

January 31, 2017, 4:00pm EST                                                                                         Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

We have some key central bank meetings this week.

Remember, it wasn’t too long ago that the world was sitting on every word uttered by a central banker.  Those days are likely over — at least to the extreme extent of the past decade.  For now, Trump has supplanted central bankers as the most powerful policy maker in the world.

Still, the Fed will meet following their rate hike last month, the second in their very slow hiking cycle – 1/4 point hike twelve months apart.  They’ll do nothing this week, but the data tends to be going as desired by the Fed, and other major central banks for that matter (aside from Japan) — meaning, inflation has recovered and is nearing the target zone.

Remember, this time last year, the world was staring down the barrel of DE-flation again.  Inflation, central bankers have tools to combat.  Deflation is far more difficult, and far less predictable.  It can spiral and grind economies to a halt. When consumers are convinced prices will be cheaper in the future, they wait.  When they wait, economic activity stalls.  With that, deflation tends to create more deflation.  The fear of that scenario, and the potential of an irreversible spiral, is why central bankers were cutting rates to negative territory last year.

Where was the imminent deflationary threat coming from?  Slow economic activity, but mostly a crash in oil prices.

Central bankers have the tendency to change the rules of the game when it suits them.  When inflation is running hot, they may hold off on tightening money by pointing to hot “food and energy” prices. These are temporary influences, as they say.  Interestingly, they are much more aggressive, though, when oil prices are creating a deflationary threat – as they did last year.

With that, oil prices have doubled from the lows of last February.  So it shouldn’t be too surprising that inflation numbers are rising, and getting close to the desired targets (around 2%) of the central bankers of the U.S., Europe and England.

So will we see a turning point for global central banks (not just the Fed) in the months ahead?  The world has already been pricing in the likelihood that the pro-growth policies coming from the Trump administration will take the burden of manufacturing economic recovery off of the central banks.

But we may find that “transitory oil prices” will be the excuse for more inaction by the Fed, and continued QE from the ECB and BOE in the months ahead, which may result in a slower pace of rate hikes than both the Fed projected in December and the market has been anticipating.

Higher rates at this stage: 1) creates problems for the housing recovery, 2) promotes more capital flight from emerging markets like China (which means more dollar strength),and 3) threatens to neutralize the fiscal stimulus and reform coming down the pike for the U.S.

In December, the Fed dialed back their talk about letting the economy run hot (i.e. staying well behind the curve on inflation to make sure recovery is robust).   We’ll see if they switch gears again and start explaining away the inflation numbers to oil prices.

For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

 

By Bryan Rich 

January 30, 2017, 4:00pm EST                                                Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

The Trump agenda continues to dominate the market focus as we entered the second week of Trumponomics.

To this point the market focus has been on the pro-growth agenda.  With that, stocks have been higher, yields have been higher, the dollar has been higher, and global commodities have been broadly rising. Meanwhile, gold (the fear trade) has been falling and the VIX has been falling, toward ultra-low levels.  The VIX, like gold, is a good market indicator of uncertainty and/or fear.

Let’s talk about the VIX…

The VIX measures the implied volatility of options on the S&P 500. This is a key component in the price investors pay for downside protection on their portfolios.

So what is implied volatility?  Implied volatility measures both actual volatility and the options market maker community’s expectations (or perception of certainty) about future volatility.  When market makers feel confident about the stability in markets, implied vol is lower, which makes the price of options cheaper.  When they aren’t confident in stability, implied vol goes up, which makes the price of an option go up.  To compensate those that are taking the other side of your trade, for the lack of predictability, you pay a premium.

With that in mind, on Friday, the VIX traded to the lowest levels since the days before the failure of Lehman Brothers. That indicates that the market had (or has) become a believer that pro-growth policies, combined with ultra-easy central bank policies have created a buffer against the downside in stocks.  But that perception of downside risk is changing today, with the more vocal uprising against Trump social policies.  You can see the spike (in the far right of the chart) today…

jan30 vix

So as big money managers were closing the week last Friday, looking at Dow 20,000+ and a VIX sliding toward levels not too far from pre-crisis levels, buying downside protection was dirt cheap. This morning, they’re paying quite a bit more for that protection.

With that said, this pop in the VIX and the Dow trading off by more than 100 points today gets a lot of attention.  But is there justification to think that market turbulence will begin to reflect the turbulence and division in public opinion toward Trump policies?  Just gauging the extent of the market reaction from the VIX today, it’s unlikely.  The chart below is the longer term view of the VIX.

jan30 vix long term

My observations: The VIX has had a small bounce from very, very low levels.  On an absolute basis, vol is still very cheap.  When there is real fear in the air, real uncertainty about the future, you can see from the spikes in the longer term chart above, the premium for the unknown gets priced in quickly and aggressively.  Given that there has been virtually no risk premium priced into the market for any falter in the Trump Presidency, or the execution of Trump policies, the moves today have been very modest. And gold (as I write) is barely changed on the day.

We are likely entering an incredible era for investing, which will be an opportunity for average investors to make up ground on the meager wealth creation and retirement savings opportunities of the past decade.  For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

By Bryan Rich 

January 27, 2017, 4:00pm EST                                                                                         Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

We’re finishing the first full week under Trumponomics. And it’s been an active one.

It’s clear now that President Trump intends to follow through on his campaign promises. While that’s making waves with the media and with Washington types, it’s creating more certainty about the outlook for growth for the real economy and, therefore, for financial markets.

We close the week with the Dow above 20,000, on new record highs. And as we discussed yesterday, stock markets around the world are rallying too on the prospects of a stronger U.S. economy translating into a stronger global economy. We looked at the charts of Mexican and Canadian stocks yesterday–both of which are sitting on record highs. U.K. stocks are near record highs and German stocks are quickly closing in.

We already know that small business optimism in the U.S. has hit 12-year highs, jumping by the most in since 1980–on Trump’s pro-growth agenda. Today the consumer sentiment report showed sentiment is on the rise too–at 13-year highs.

Let’s talk about the data that we’re leaving behind. Fourth quarter GDP was reported today at just 1.9%. This, more than seven years removed from the failure of Lehman Brothers, an $800 billion stimulus package, seven years of zero interest rates and three rounds of quantitative easing, and the economy is running at about 60% of its normal pace. And even after taking the Fed’s balance sheet from $800 billion to $4.5 trillion, we have inflation running at less than 50% of its normal pace. This malaise is consistent throughout the world. And this is precisely why big, bold fiscal stimulus and structural change is desperately needed, and is being embraced by those that understand the dangers of the stall-speed global economy that has been kept alive by global central bank intervention. As I’ve said, at Dow 20,000, it’s just getting started.

Have a great weekend!

We are likely entering an incredible era for investing, which will be an opportunity for average investors to make up ground on the meager wealth creation and retirement savings opportunities of the past decade.  For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

By Bryan Rich 

January 26, 2017, 3:30pm EST                                                                                         Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

We talked yesterday about the significance of Dow 20,000.  Higher stock prices are fuel for higher stock prices.  And higher stock prices are fuel for better economic growth.  It’s all self-reinforcing, and we discussed the reasons why stocks can still go much, much higher from here.
As I said, this serves as a validation marker for some that have been waiting to see what the Trump effect might be on markets.  If you’ve listened to the consensus voice on Trumponomics, they’ve told you over and over how disastrous the protectionist rhetoric would be the U.S. economy and for the world.  I’ve said, given the position of the world, post-Great recession, that Trump’s tough talk is leverage that can be used to ultimately create a fair playing field on trade, which can ultimately lead toward a rebalancing of the global economy — something that has to take place to put the world back on a path of sustainable growth, and end the cycle of booms and busts. That’s a win-win for everyone.

We’ve seen it working with industry leaders (they’re playing ball).  And expect a similar outcome on the geopolitical front.  This approach doesn’t work in normal times, but we’re not in normal times, almost a decade after the onset of the global financial crisis — where global economies remain weak and vulnerable.

With this in mind, Mexico and Canada are in focus with the announcement this week of the NAFTA renegotiation, the wall and the Keystone pipeline.  And the media is hot and heavy on the cancellation of a trip to the White House by the Mexican President.

Let’s take a look at how Trumponomics is working for our two biggest trading partners, thus far.

This is the chart of the dollar versus the Mexican Peso.  The rising line represents the dollar strengthening and the peso weakening, and vice versa.

If we look at this exchange rate as a gauge of trade partner health, we’ve seen the peso hit hard through the campaigning period under the protectionist fears of a Trump administration – and post election.  That has represented a negative-scenario message for Mexico. But since the inauguration, the peso has been strengthening (not weakening), even as President Trump signed an executive order to renegotiate NAFTA. The message behind that usually means: the U.S. does better, Mexico does better.

What about Mexican stocks? Similar story.  As the U.S. stock market is on record highs, the Mexican stock market too, is sitting on record highs. When the prospects are better for U.S. growth, our trade partners do better.

What about Canada?  The same story.  The Canadian stock market is on record highs.

The worst-case scenarios are good fodder for attracting readers and viewers.  That’s why the media is obsessively focused on the potential negatives. But with some perspective on the bigger picture, and with respect to the position of the world coming out of the crisis period, those worst-case scenarios have lower probabilities than they think, and would have you believe.  That’s why reality is crafting a very different story.

We are likely entering an incredible era for investing, which will be an opportunity for average investors to make up ground on the meager wealth creation and retirement savings opportunities of the past decade.  For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

 

By Bryan Rich 

January 25, 2017, 1:30pm EST                                                                                        Invest Alongside Billionaires For $297/Qtr

The Dow broke 20,000 today.  I want to talk about why it’s a big deal.

As we discussed when we entered the new year, “Trump’s Plan Is A Recipe For Restoring Animal Spirits.”  Watch out, it’s coming.

Remember, this (animal spirits) is the element that economists and analysts can’t predict, and can’t quantify. It’s not in the forecasts. This is what has been destroyed over the past decade, driven primarily by the fear of indebtedness (which is typical of a debt crisis) and mistrust of the system. All along the way, throughout the recovery  period, and throughout a tripling of the stock market off of the bottom, people have continually been waiting for another shoe to drop. The breaking of this emotional mindset has been underway since the night of the election. And that gives way to a return of animal spirits.

Higher stock prices tend to beget higher stock prices. Trust me, individual investors that haven’t been believers will be calling their financial advisors and logging in to their online brokerage accounts over the coming days.  Institutional investors that haven’t been believers, that have been underweight stocks, will be beefing up exposure if they want to compete with their peers (and keep their jobs).

And not only do higher stock prices lead to higher stock prices, but higher stock prices tend to make people feel more confident about the economy, which begets a better economy.

Add to this, the psychological value of Dow 20,000 could finally be a turning point in the divergence of sentiment toward the Trump Presidency.  It may serve as a validation marker for those that have been on the fence.  And for those in opposition, as I’ve said before, growth solves a lot of problems!  When the college grad that’s been relegated to a 10-year career as a barista begins to see signs of opportunity for a better career and a better future, in a stronger economy, the sands of Trump sentiment can shift quickly.

Cleary, Trump entered with a game plan that can pop economic growth.  And he’s going 100 miles an hour at executing on that plan. For markets, what he’s doing is creating a sense of certainty for investors. They know what he’s promised, and now they know that he appears to intend on delivering on those promises.  And the coordination of growth policies, along with ultra-easy monetary policy (even with tightening in view) serves as risk mitigators for markets. It should limit downside risk, which is what investors care most about.  How?

Remember, even at Dow 20,000, stocks are still extremely cheap.

Here’s a review on why …

Reason #1: To return to the long-term trajectory of 8% annualized returns for the S&P 500, the broad stock market would still need to recovery another 48% by the middle of this year. We’re still making up for the lost growth of the past decade. And there’s a lot of ground to make up.

Reason #2: In low-rate environments, the valuation on the broad market tends to run north of 20 times earnings. Adjusting for that multiple, we can see a reasonable path to a 16% return for the year.  That’s an S&P 500 earnings estimate of $133.64 times a P/E of 20 equals 2,672 on the S&P 500.

Reason #3: The proposed corporate tax rate cut from 35% to 15% is estimated to drive S&P 500 earnings UP from an estimated $132 per share for next year, to as high as $157. Apply $157 to a 20x P/E and you get 3,140 in the S&P 500. That’s 37% higher.

With this in mind, we are likely entering an incredible era for investing, which will be an opportunity for average investors to make up ground on the meager wealth creation and retirement savings opportunities of the past decade.  For help building a high potential portfolio for 2017, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016.  You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

 

By Bryan Rich 

January 24, 2017, 4:30pm EST

The S&P 500 traded up to new record highs today.  This morning the new President had three more big American business leaders (the car makers) in the White House for a face-to-face.
The three big American car makers all had big stock performance on the day, and their leaders walked away with very positive remarks (not dismay). It turns out that logical business operators like the prospects of doing business with the tailwinds of pro-growth economic policies.

Now, with Obamacare on the chopping block for the new administration, today let’s take a look what healthcare stocks might do.

Healthcare stocks in general have been beaten up since July of 2015, when a Republican Congress brought a vote to repeal Obamacare.  The S&P 500 is up 7% from that date.  The XLF (the ETF that tracks healthcare stocks) is down 9% in the same period.

Before that, Obamacare had been a money printing machine for much of the healthcare industry.

In this chart below, of the health insurance provider, Aetna, you can see the impact of Obamacare on the stock.

And here’s a look at the hospital company, HCA, also a big winner under Obamacare.

So what happens under Trump care?  Trump has said he wants to keep people insured.  It sounds like a rework to a more competitive system, rather than a tear down and rebuild.  The first sign of visibility on a new plan is probably the greenlight to buy the healthcare ETF, and maybe the under performers in the Obamacare era.

For help building a high potential portfolio, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016. You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

 

By Bryan Rich 

January 23, 2017, 4:30pm EST

The new President Trump has wasted no time on carrying out his plan on trade.  He met with 12 major U.S. company leaders today and told them that they would pay to build outside of the U.S., but (importantly) they would save to build here.  And he wrote an executive order to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and one to renegotiate NAFTA.

There are plenty of people that have focused on the risks and the dangers with the Trump trade policies. Meanwhile, those most directly affected aren’t quite as draconian on the outlook — quite the opposite.  The executives that have walked out of Trump Tower, and now the White House have largely been optimistic. The same is said for trade partners.  Whether they mean it or not, they understand the value of doing business with the U.S. consumer.

As I’ve said, there are clear opportunities for win-wins – especially in a world that must rebalance trade to avoid more cycles of the booms and busts, like the boom-bust we experienced over the past two decades.  The administration has the leverage of power (with a Republican Congress), but they also have the leverage of rewards.  Despite what the media tells us, behind closed doors the new administration seems to negotiate by carrot rather than stick.  Trump comes to meetings bearing gifts, and that creates buy-in.

When you bring American CEOs in and tell them that you’re going to give them a 20 percentage point tax cut, you’re going to slash the regulation burden (by “75%” as he said today), you’re going to give them a 30+ percentage point tax cut on repatriating offshore money,  and your going to launch a trillion dollar infrastructure spend, all in an effort to juice the economy to a 4%+ growth rate, they’re going to be very excited — even if you tell them they can no longer access the cheapest production in the world.

In the end, they’d rather have a hot economy to sell into, than a stagnant economy, even if it comes with a higher cost of production.  And we may find that, in the end, the after-tax profit margins of these big U.S. corporates may be better given all of these incentives, even if they make things here. Better revenues, and maybe better margins to go with it.

Remember, the optimism of U.S. small business owners made the biggest jump since 1980 on the prospects of growth-friendly Trump policies.   GDP equals Consumption + Investment + Government Spending + Net Exports. Ultra easy monetary policies have made borrowing cheap, saving expensive and created the economic stability necessary to get hiring over the past several years.  That has all kept consumption going.

The “build it here” policies are a recipe for capital investment to finally ramp up.  Add to that, a big government infrastructure spend, and we’re getting the pieces of the puzzle in place to see much better economic growth. A hotter U.S. economy will mean a hotter global economy. With that, I suspect net exports will ultimately pick up as well, with a healthier, more sustainable global economy.

On that note, if we look at the USD/Mexican Peso exchange rate as a gauge of trade partner health, we’ve seen the peso hit hard through the campaigning period under the protectionist fears of a Trump administration.  Interestingly, since the inauguration, the peso has been strengthening, even as President Trump signed an executive order today to renegotiate NAFTA. The message behind that usually means: the U.S. does better, Mexico does better.

For help building a high potential portfolio, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016. You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.

dell, whirlpool, ford, johnson and johnson, lockheed, arconic, u.s. steel, tesla, under armour, international paper, corning, trump, white house

 

By Bryan Rich 

January 20, 2017, 4:15pm EST

President Trump officially took office today.  From the close of business on November 8th, as people across the country were still voting, the S&P 500 has climbed 6% – from election night through today.  The dollar index has risen 2.8.  The broad commodities index is up 6%.  The 10 year Treasury note is down 4% — which means the yield is UP from 1.80% to about 2.50%.

His policy agenda has clearly been a game changer.

But if you recall, the broad sentiment going into the election was that a Trump Presidency would cause a stock market crash.  These were people that weren’t calibrating the meaningful shift in sentiment that came from projecting pro-growth policies in a world that has been starved for growth. That event (the election) alone did more to cure the global deflation risk than the trillions of dollars that central banks have been pouring into the global economy.

But many still aren’t buying it.  I don’t often read financial news. I’d rather look at the primary sources (the data or hear from the actors themselves/ the horse’s mouth) and interpret for myself.  But today, I had a look across the web.  Four of the five top headlines on a major financial news site, on inauguration day, ranged from negative to doom-and-gloom — all laying blame on the dangers of Trump.

Because Trump has talked tough on trade, the common threat most refer to is a potential trade war. But remember, Trump has also talked tough on U.S. companies moving jobs overseas.  Thus far, he hasn’t created enemies, he’s gotten concessions and has created allies. He’s used leverage, and he’s negotiated win-wins.  Expect him to do the same with trade partners. With pro-growth policies coming down the pike and a meaningful pop in U.S. economic growth coming, no country, especially in the current state of the global economy, will want to be locked out of trade with the United States.

For help building a high potential portfolio, follow me in our Billionaire’s Portfolio, where you look over my shoulder as I follow the world’s best investors into their best stocks.  Our portfolio more than doubled the return of the S&P 500 in 2016. You can join me here and get positioned for a big 2017.