Gold Is A Hedge Against The Worst-Case Scenario

By Bryan Rich

June 24,  5:00 pm EST

Let’s take a look at gold as we head into the Trump/Xi meeting scheduled to take place at the end of the week’s G20 meeting.

Gold has been sold all along as an “inflation hedge.”  But unless you have Weimar Republic-like hyperinflation, you’re unlikely to get the inflation-hedge value out owning it.

Remember, gold went on a tear from sub-$700 to above $1,900 following the onset of global QE (led by the Fed).  Gold ran up as high as 182%.  That was pricing in 41% annualized inflation at one point (as a dollar for dollar hedge).  Of course, inflation didn’t comply.  Still, ten years after the Fed’s first round of QE and massive global responses, we’ve been able to muster just a little better than 1% annualized inflation.

If you bought gold at the top in 2011, the value of your “investment” was cut in half just four years later.   That’s a lot of risk to take for the prospect of “hedging” against the loss of purchasing power in the paper money in your wallet.

So, gold isn’t a hedge against inflation, it’s a hedge against the worst-case scenario. It’s for sovereign wealth and anyone else that can take delivery, own and control the storage. For almost everyone else, it’s a speculative trade.

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